Category Archive: Science Friday

Can a Wild Coho Salmon Population Recover Following Closure of a Hatchery Program

Today’s post is the conclusion of our two part guest series on the recovery of Coho in Oregon’s Salmon River. (Click here for last weeks post) Lately we have shared several studies on Pink and Coho salmon, which provide important lessons for salmonid recovery efforts across a range of species and watersheds. Perhaps the most … Continued

Science Friday: Restoring the River Salmon: The Coho Return

Today we are re-publishing an excellent article by Dan Bottom on the remarkable against all odds recovery of Salmon River Coho. This article was originally written for and published by the Reflections program at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology near Otis on Oregon’s Salmon River.   This article was submitted by Dan Bottom, … Continued

Science Friday: The latest from the longest running steelhead monitoring project in British Columbia

  Thank goodness it’s Friday. Fall is in the air and it’s time to get on the river! But first, let’s give our steelhead IQs another booster shot with a new Science Friday post.   This week we have a guest writer and scientist, Colin Bailey, a PhD student studying fisheries science at Simon Fraser … Continued

Not too hot, not too cold, the ocean must be just right

Two weeks ago we were on the Dean. This week we go even further north, to Auke Bay near Juneau, Alaska, for our next Science Friday post.   The greater Juneau are is home to several rivers that host wild steelhead runs. Auke Creek is perhaps the most important of these feeder streams, as scientists … Continued

Science Friday: Some come early, some come late: Genetics of Dean River steelhead

There are a handful of rivers that every steelheader wants to fish. Among these is the Dean River in British Columbia, perhaps the most revered wild steelhead river on the planet. Not only is this river remote and beautiful, it is also home to some of the hardest fighting steelhead anywhere.   The Dean’s fame … Continued

Science Friday: Sand bars, lagoons and moving steelhead

Back to back Science Friday posts focusing on California and the unique challenges that steelhead face in the state. This week we pivot from juvenile steelhead coping with ponded pools to a look at juveniles that enter and live seasonally in lagoons at the mouths of creeks and rivers — a phenomenon fairly common in … Continued

Science Friday: Surviving heat, drought and ponded streams

It is that time of year again. Heat wave after heat wave.   As summer progresses stream flows will continue to decline all across steelhead country, and in some cases, smaller tributaries will go dry. In other cases, streams won’t be completely dewatered; instead, they will become ponded. This occurs when flows diminish so much … Continued

Science Friday: How does catch and release affect steelhead?

Today we review a study on the impacts of catch and release angling on wild steelhead in the Bulkley River, the largest tributary to British Columbia’s legendary Skeena system. Conducted by Will Twardek and several others, this study looked into the effects of catch and release, air exposure and fight time on behavior and survival … Continued

Science Friday: Big fish, big streams; little fish, little streams

A holiday weekend deserves a new Science Friday post. So here we go. This week we focus on summer steelhead in the John Day River, a large tributary that drains into the middle Columbia River on the Oregon side.   The John Day is a big watershed, covering 8,000 square miles, although the river itself … Continued

Science Friday: Do these lipids make me look fat?

For most anglers who have encountered both winter and summer steelhead, it’s abundantly clear there are differences between the two races of fish.   For one, they enter freshwater at different times of the year, although there is some overlap.   In addition, there are physical differences. Summer steelhead tend to be more fusiform — … Continued