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Early History of Great Lakes Steelhead

In Science Friday, Steelhead Files by Kyle Smith

Time for another Science Friday. As followers of these posts know, we like to bring you interesting and useful knowledge about steelhead from a variety of sources. This week,we have a guest author: Brian Morrison. Brian is a scientist and angler who lives in Ontario, Canada, and he was kind enough to drop some knowledge about steelhead in the Great …

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What is the relationship between freshwater and ocean growth and steelhead life histories in the Situk River

In Alaska, Science Friday, Steelhead Files by Kyle Smith

We are in the heart of winter steelhead season now. Some regions are experiencing poor returns of wild fish this year, while others are faring better. As steelheaders we ride the wave, from good years to bad ones and everything in between.  This week we are back with a Science Friday post on a recent study on wild steelhead in …

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Science Friday- Just how much diversity can one creek support? Asotin Creek provides an example

In Science Friday, Snake River, Steelhead Files, Washington by Kyle Smith

If only it was as simple as an adipose fin.  The presence of an adipose fin is universally recognized as the mark.  An individual with an adipose fin is, with a few exceptions, considered a wild steelhead.  On the other hand, those marked, clipped, or ad-intact fish, they are the hatchery ones. Although it is but a small mark, the …

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Science Friday- What Have We Lost?

In Columbia River, Oregon, Science Friday, Steelhead Files by Kyle Smith

Imagine going back in time 100 years to the Columbia River. What do you think the steelhead looked like then? How long were they? How much did they weigh?   In the early 1900s scientists working with the federal Bureau of Fisheries visited the Columbia River, which was considered the center of steelhead abundance for the Lower 48 – and frankly, …

eDNA and O. mykiss, part II

In Science Friday by steelheaders

Natalie Stauffer-Olsen   Two weeks ago we looked at the use of eDNA in monitoring for the presence or absence of aquatic species. While our post was not a comprehensive review of this subject, we did include some of the most promising aspects — and some of the challenges — associated with using this new technology.   In short, eDNA …

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Science Friday: The value of new technology: eDNA and O. mykiss

In Science Friday by steelheaders

By Natalie Stauffer-Olsen   It is always exciting when new technology becomes available that can help us understand, manage and protect wild steelhead, the mavericks of the Pacific salmonids.   Steelhead and rainbow trout populations can be difficult to predict, model and understand because of their very plastic (scientific term for highly variable) life histories, from juveniles to adults. What’s …