Science Friday: What the heck do all those acronyms mean?

In Science Friday by Nick Chambers

Science Friday! Another chance to dive into the weeds and define some of the jargon used when discussing, studying and evaluating hatchery steelhead. This week we focus on acronyms commonly used in hatchery management plans.   Anyone who has read through a Hatchery Scientific Review Group plan or review, or most any resource management plan for that matter, has probably …

Science Friday: What is introgression?

In Science Friday by Nick Chambers

For this edition of Science Friday, we continue to define terms used in studies that evaluate hatchery steelhead (and often other species of salmon and trout). Last week we defined fitness and discussed how it is measured and why it is important to understanding the biology of steelhead. This week we take another step into the deeper end of the …

Steelhead 101: Defining types of steelhead hatcheries

In Science Friday, Steelhead Files by Nick Chambers

Every steelhead angler is probably somewhat familiar with hatcheries. As we discussed last week, deciphering the jargon associated with hatcheries is important, but can also be difficult. This week’s terminology is more common-place, and many of you may be familiar with it already. But, just in case, let’s look at the terms used to broadly classify hatchery programs: segregated and …

Steelhead 101: Defining native, wild, hatchery and natural-origin

In Alaska, California, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Washington by Nick Chambers

In recent posts we covered the basics of defining escapement and run size, and the ways these are measured by resource managers. Today, we turn our focus to the complex terminology used for describing and comparing hatchery and wild steelhead. Steelhead are typically referred to as either being “wild” or “hatchery,” but they may also be defined as being “native” …

Steelhead 101: Estimating steelhead run size

In Oregon, Science Friday by Nick Chambers

Recently we have described the various methods used by biologists and resource managers to estimate steelhead escapement, which is the number of fish that escape and survive fisheries (all forms of angling) to actually spawn in a watershed.   Run size is the total number of steelhead that return to a watershed each year. In order to estimate run size …

Steelhead 101: Using weirs to estimate adult steelhead escapement

In Oregon, Science Friday by Nick Chambers

Recently we have described how scientists use redd counts and snorkel surveys to estimate steelhead escapement. This week we focus on weirs, a totally different way of counting steelhead. Rather than sending out surveyors to sample stretches of stream where they count redds or fish, the operation of a weir is much simpler. A weir basically blocks the river and …

Steelhead 101: Using snorkel surveys to estimate adult steelhead escapement

In Alaska, California, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Washington by Nick Chambers

Another week, another post on how scientists and fisheries managers measure steelhead escapement. Last week, we described redd counts and why they are an important tool. This week, we review snorkel surveys.   Snorkel surveys entail divers swimming in the river and visually counting adult steelhead. Like redd counts, snorkel surveys do not cover an entire river, but rather break …

Steelhead 101: Using redd counts to estimate escapement of steelhead

In Oregon, Science Friday by steelheaders

  Last week we defined the terms run size and escapement. If you didn’t see the post, check it out.  This week we will discuss how fisheries managers actually measure escapement for wild steelhead using redd counts, and some of the challenges they face in doing so.     We begin with escapement because it is usually measured first, and …

Steelhead 101: Escapement

In Science Friday by steelheaders

One thing is certain — science is loaded with jargon. You almost need a PhD just to understand some of the technical language. While technical language is valuable to those that study and manage steelhead, it can also detract from sharing and explaining key messages – particularly in situations where various terms are bandied about without definition. For example, I …

6 Reasons sonar is so cool for steelhead

In Oregon, Science Friday, Washington by steelheaders

If you’re trying to manage steelhead, one of the more difficult tasks you will have is getting an accurate picture of what populations are doing over a given time.   Unlike many of their brethren, steelhead don’t put all their “eggs in one basket.” Runs are timed throughout the year, often during times of high water and poor visibility. This …