Juvenile steelhead doing what it takes to become a smolt: You grow in summer, I’ll grow in winter

In Oregon, Science Friday, Steelhead Files, Washington by Nick Chambers

Another Friday, another blog post on the science of steelhead. We love this day of the week! Our topic this week is the growth of juvenile steelhead.  Did you know that the growth rate of steelhead can vary depending on the season of the year?  This variation in growth rate can be considerable. There are a number of reasons that …

Asotin Creek – WDFW update

In Idaho, Science Friday, Steelhead Files, Washington by steelheaders

By Ethan Crawford, Fisheries Biologist – WDFW Asotin Creek Project An earlier blog post described the great resiliency of wild steelhead in Asotin Creek and noted that this resiliency is in part due to a combination of a variety factors: improved habitat quality, increased spill at hydroelectric facilities, good ocean conditions, and a great reduction in hatchery origin steelhead spawners, …

Life history diversity: dispersing risk

In California, Science Friday, Steelhead Files by steelheaders

By Brian Hodge Just as investors diversify their portfolio of assets to minimize financial loss, fisheries managers may diversify their portfolio of conservation strategies to minimize species loss. Another fishy analog for the “portfolio effect” comes from the steelhead—it reduces risk of extinction by displaying a diverse array of life histories, or pathways from hatch to spawn. My colleagues and …

The advantage of avalanches

In Idaho, Science Friday, Steelhead Files by Shauna Sherard

  Here in this timbered, steep, up and down country of Idaho, the forces at work are not merely wind and water. Here, the tumble of rocks and cracking of large trees has been important to shaping river habitat for centuries. Avalanches are not just territory for the backcountry skier. They’re good for steelhead too. Think of them like door-to-river …

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Steelhead in Orlando ICAST/IFTD report

In Steelhead Files by steelheaders

Each year in Orlando the entire fishing industry gets together for their trade show,  ICAST/IFTD. It’s the place where everyone who makes a living off the tug on the end of a hook gathers to see what is new, take orders from dealers and learn about trends in the industry, including conservation issues.   With so many industry professionals present the …

Rivers of Resilience – Wind

In Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Steelhead Files, Washington by Nick Chambers

The Wind River, a tributary to the Columbia River just above Bonneville Dam, is, at only 224 square miles, a substantially smaller drainage than the Yakima. It receives more precipitation and thus is dominated by forests and industrial timberlands. The Wind River has had some habitat restoration but nowhere near the extent of the Yakima, but that is also because …