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Business as usual won’t restore the Eel River

In California by Sam Davidson

At one time, California’s Eel River once had incredibly abundant salmon, steelhead, and Pacific lamprey fisheries. But dams, major water diversions, legacy impacts from clearcut logging, and illegal cannabis cultivation have compromised the Eel’s productivity for salmonids and lamprey.

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Flowing free in ’23

In California, Oregon by Sam Davidson

Part 3 of Life after dams: The Klamath River, straddling the border between California and Oregon, is the third most productive watershed for salmon and steelhead on the West Coast. The Klamath is also Ground Zero for one of the most challenging water conflicts in U.S. history.

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Remembering Russell Chatham

In California, Steelhead Files by Kyle Smith

  Renowned landscape painter, writer and fly fisherman Russell Chatham passed away on November 10 at the age of 80.   I never knew Chatham, but his book The Anglers Coast and the film Rivers of a Lost Coast – in which he is a main character – are gospel to northern California fly anglers. He was our prophet, spreading …

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Science Friday: Why is your lateral line different than mine?

In Science Friday by steelheaders

Most of us working on behalf of wild steelhead love our jobs. Still, after a long week we are ready to hit the water — and share some more Science Friday steelhead knowledge.   This week we touch on a study conducted by Andrew Brown at the University of Washington, along with several co-authors. The paper is here:  https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0059162   …

Lessons from a steelhead rescue and captive rearing program on California’s Carmel River

In Oregon by Nick Chambers

By: Natalie Stauffer-Olsen, Staff Scientist, TU’s California Science Program   One of the things that I have always admired most about O. mykiss is how adaptable and resilient they are. The rainbow trout, in both its resident and anadromous forms, evolved to take advantage of the most abundant habitats for their different life history stages as well as the genetic …

Science Friday: Why are half pounders declining in the Trinity River?

In Science Friday by Nick Chambers

When anglers dream of steelhead, they mostly fantasize about fish that have spent 2-4 years in the ocean and return to freshwater to spawn as full adults, packing four or more pounds and brutish power into their physique. However, one of the most common forms of returning steelhead in some rivers is not the adult, but the so-called half-pounder.   …