Much at stake in listing decision on Northern California summer steelhead

In California by steelheaders

We love all steelhead here at Wild Steelheaders United, but some anadromous O. mykiss populations may deserve more love than others.   Consider wild summer run steelhead in Northern California. The available data for wild summers between Redwood Creek and the Gualala River (including the legendary Eel River watershed) suggest their numbers are greatly depleted — probably enough to warrant …

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Carving a path through the debate over upper Willamette steelhead

In Oregon by steelheaders

  Carving a path through the debate over upper Willamette steelhead   There are no easy decisions in the world of steelhead conservation and management, but some issues are more difficult than others, such as hatcheries.   Although the science on hatcheries is solid and critical to guiding management of wild steelhead, there is a role for hatcheries, as long as …

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Science Friday: The value of new technology: eDNA and O. mykiss

In Science Friday by steelheaders

By Natalie Stauffer-Olsen   It is always exciting when new technology becomes available that can help us understand, manage and protect wild steelhead, the mavericks of the Pacific salmonids.   Steelhead and rainbow trout populations can be difficult to predict, model and understand because of their very plastic (scientific term for highly variable) life histories, from juveniles to adults. What’s …

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Science Friday: Revisiting the Carmel River Steelhead Mitigation Program

In Oregon by steelheaders

Written by Natalie Stauffer-Olsen, PhD, TU Staff Scientist    Every now and then we publish something that prompts a reaction from the authors of a report we analyze or others in the science world. This happened with our recent post on the Carmel River  that focused on some biological and ecological aspects explored in the paper “Size-conditional smolting and the …

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Throwback Thursday- A Friendly Reminder: Hatchery Steelhead Are Tasty

In Alaska, California, Idaho, Oregon, Steelhead Files, Washington by steelheaders

With summer just around the corner, the Wild Steelheaders crew is feeling a bit nostalgic.  Winter rods are packed up and summer steelhead are a ways away, and we’ve been finding ourselves daydreaming of tiny flies, drylines, baseball games, cherry pie, and some of the internet’s most prolific fishy blog posts.  In the spirit of days gone by, we’re kicking …

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In Support of a Hatchery Steelhead Program in the Upper Willamette

In Oregon, Steelhead Files by steelheaders

  By Dean Finnerty, Wild Steelhead Initiative Director Trout Unlimited’s Wild Steelhead Initiative is all about increasing populations of wild steelhead across their native range. Why should we care so much about wild steelhead? There are several reasons, among them the fact that wild steelhead cost nothing to produce, they can be more aggressive towards the gear anglers use to …

Science Friday: Can innovative methods for a wild broodstock hatchery rebuild a depleted wild population

In Oregon, Science Friday by Nick Chambers

This week we send you off with a review of a recent before-and-after study on hatchery steelhead published by Barry Berejikian and Donald Van Doornick (find the study here).  The goal of this long-term study, conducted in a handful of rivers in Hood Canal, Washington, was to determine if a well-designed hatchery program could help rebuild populations of steelhead that …

The Maury Povich Steelhead Show: You are all the father

In Science Friday by Nick Chambers

Took a short break from our Science Friday posts to do some actual science (on Olympic Peninsula winter steelhead) and to weigh in on some important policy issues. But now, like anglers looking for fresh winter chrome: we’re b-a-a-a-c-k.   As you know, in the Science Friday forum we discuss a wide range of topics important to the management and …

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Can a Wild Coho Salmon Population Recover Following Closure of a Hatchery Program

In California, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Washington by Nick Chambers

Today’s post is the conclusion of our two part guest series on the recovery of Coho in Oregon’s Salmon River. (Click here for last weeks post) Lately we have shared several studies on Pink and Coho salmon, which provide important lessons for salmonid recovery efforts across a range of species and watersheds. Perhaps the most important lesson is that decisions …