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Science Friday: Certain genetic families survive better in hatcheries and might help explain why hatchery steelhead do poorly in nature

In Science Friday by Nick Chambers

Spring is here and we’ve got a real shot of warm weather on the West Coast. Certainly, spawning steelhead appreciate the ecological effects of this boost in thermal energy.   Last week we reviewed a recent paper on repeat spawning in steelhead in the Hood River, Oregon. This week, we return to the Hood to look at another paper out …

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Stock Recruit Curves And Wild Steelhead, A Good Match?

In Science Friday by Nick Chambers

In several recent posts we have discussed the concept of density dependence and how it is used in fisheries management. Today we dive in deeper and talk about the stock-recruitment relationship, density dependence, and how the results of such models are applied to managing steelhead.   First, let’s define some terms. Stock refers to, in this context, a population of …

Science Friday: Why are half pounders declining in the Trinity River?

In Science Friday by Nick Chambers

When anglers dream of steelhead, they mostly fantasize about fish that have spent 2-4 years in the ocean and return to freshwater to spawn as full adults, packing four or more pounds and brutish power into their physique. However, one of the most common forms of returning steelhead in some rivers is not the adult, but the so-called half-pounder.   …

Science Friday: What the heck do all those acronyms mean?

In Science Friday by Nick Chambers

Science Friday! Another chance to dive into the weeds and define some of the jargon used when discussing, studying and evaluating hatchery steelhead. This week we focus on acronyms commonly used in hatchery management plans.   Anyone who has read through a Hatchery Scientific Review Group plan or review, or most any resource management plan for that matter, has probably …

Steelhead 101: Defining types of steelhead hatcheries

In Science Friday, Steelhead Files by Nick Chambers

Every steelhead angler is probably somewhat familiar with hatcheries. As we discussed last week, deciphering the jargon associated with hatcheries is important, but can also be difficult. This week’s terminology is more common-place, and many of you may be familiar with it already. But, just in case, let’s look at the terms used to broadly classify hatchery programs: segregated and …

Steelhead 101: Defining native, wild, hatchery and natural-origin

In Alaska, California, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Washington by Nick Chambers

In recent posts we covered the basics of defining escapement and run size, and the ways these are measured by resource managers. Today, we turn our focus to the complex terminology used for describing and comparing hatchery and wild steelhead. Steelhead are typically referred to as either being “wild” or “hatchery,” but they may also be defined as being “native” …

Steelhead 101: Using snorkel surveys to estimate adult steelhead escapement

In Alaska, California, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Washington by Nick Chambers

Another week, another post on how scientists and fisheries managers measure steelhead escapement. Last week, we described redd counts and why they are an important tool. This week, we review snorkel surveys.   Snorkel surveys entail divers swimming in the river and visually counting adult steelhead. Like redd counts, snorkel surveys do not cover an entire river, but rather break …

Wild Rivers, Wild Steelhead

In Oregon, Washington by Nick Chambers

What are the keys to successful wild steelhead conservation? What can you do to help this cause? How do steelhead differ from other salmonids in their sexual behavior? For answers to these and many other questions about wild steelhead, as well as some of the best steelhead stories ever told, please join Wild Steelheaders United for an evening of science, …

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Re-opening the Skagit River: More Work to be Done

In Washington by Nick Chambers

For years, the story of the Skagit River steelhead fishery has been one of decline and loss. But that story is on its way to becoming one of renewal.   The submission of a Resource Management Plan by WDFW has breathed new life into the concept of an open catch and release season on the Skagit. While this is a …