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A bridge over No Name Road

In California by Sam Davidson

A longtime landowner’s love of his rural California land and the tiny steelhead stream that flows through it is key to the success of a challenging TU-led fish passage project Bruce Dormody was born and raised on a secluded, 2600-acre property in the hills above Carmel Valley, California, operated for decades as San Clemente Rancho, a private recreational retreat on …

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Granite Grit Equals Access to Historic Habitat

In Washington by Jonathan Stumpf

Washington’s Icicle Creek has its fair share of management challenges: cumulative demands on water from agriculture, municipal use and a large national hatchery facility are just some of the factors that take a toll on flows and fish here. But a broad-based effort is underway to re-calibrate and balance those demands and accommodate the needs of fish and tribal and recreational fishing.

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Can a Wild Coho Salmon Population Recover Following Closure of a Hatchery Program

In California, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Washington by Nick Chambers

Today’s post is the conclusion of our two part guest series on the recovery of Coho in Oregon’s Salmon River. (Click here for last weeks post) Lately we have shared several studies on Pink and Coho salmon, which provide important lessons for salmonid recovery efforts across a range of species and watersheds. Perhaps the most important lesson is that decisions …

TU lauds new public lands bill for NW California

In California by Nick Chambers

  The northwest corner of California, between the Russian and Klamath Rivers, is home to some of the best remaining salmon and steelhead streams in the West. This region boasts some of the most famous steelhead fisheries in the world, including the Trinity, Mad, Mattole, and Eel River systems.   Trout Unlimited’s North Coast Coho Project has been working for …

The Salmon Coast

In Washington by Nick Chambers

The Olympic Peninsula is home to some of the last great places for wild salmon and steelhead in the Lower 48. Of course, it’s the wild steelhead that draw many of us to the OP. But it’s also the huge trees and beautiful brawling rivers that make the OP a destination for fish and anglers alike.   While much of …

Yakima Basin Integrated Plan presents next step in steelhead recovery

In Washington by steelheaders

By Justin Bezold, Project manager, Yakima, WA   No easy, one-size-fits-all solution to steelhead recovery exists in Washington; the state’s western third is often wet and lush, seemingly with water to spare year-round. The eastern two-thirds are arid and sparse, with dry streams common during critical steelhead migration and spawning periods.   While part of the underlying cause to low …

Rivers of Resilience – Yakima

In Science Friday, Steelhead Files, Washington by Nick Chambers

It can be hard to maintain faith in the steelhead world.  As noted in the recent article by Bill Herzog, it seems like we are losing wild summer runs faster than we can recover them. I would hedge that many, if not most, anglers feel the same.   Steelhead are not disappearing for lack of effort though. Frankly, it’s amazing …